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Lightness in Design
Better vision for the world, on a budget
Sped up audio: Now Hear This, Quickly
The Unbearable Lightness of Lightness
The Grid: The Next-Gen Internet?
Reconstructing shredded documents
Despite grabbing headlines, art prices don't appreciate well
The doctors were real, the patients undercover

Lightness in Design

Wired News – Nov 13, 2000 – A strange thing happened to the 'weightless' and dematerialized economy we thought the Internet would bring: it never arrived...

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Better vision for the world, on a budget

The New York Times – Jan 2, 2010 – Self-adjustable spectacles, which let untrained wearers set the right focus themselves in less than a minute, greatly reduce the need for trained optometrists, who are rarely available in Africa and many parts of Asia. But the competition is sometimes palpable amongst the companies that want to be the first to distribute adjustable glasses in the millions...

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Sped up audio: Now Hear This, Quickly

The New York Times – Oct 2, 2003 – Most research has shown that people learn just as well when listening to speech recordings that are played back at two or even three times normal speed. "People who are listening at accelerated speeds learn just as much, and there's some evidence they may learn even a bit more''...

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The Unbearable Lightness of Lightness

Wired News – Nov 16, 2000 – New technologies tend to be presented in terms of existing products so consumers will more readily understand and adapt to them.

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The Grid: The Next-Gen Internet?

Wired News – March 8, 2001 – The Matrix may be the future of virtual reality, but researchers say the Grid is the future of collaborative problem-solving.

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Reconstructing shredded documents

The New York Times – Jul 17, 2003 – Advanced scanning technology makes it possible to reconstruct documents previously thought safe from prying eyes, sometimes even pages that have been ripped into confetti-size pieces.

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Despite grabbing headlines, art prices don't appreciate well

The New York Times – Oct 30, 2009 – Art traded from 1951 to 2007 appreciated just a little more than 4 percent annually, much less than the Standard & Poor’s 500 average of 8.90 percent over the same period. The figure is also significantly less than figures from previous studies that pegged art’s annual returns at 8 percent or even 13 percent.

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The doctors were real, the patients undercover

The New York Times – Nov 20, 2009 – It had all the markings of a television detective show. Posing as patients, three undercover observers got themselves admitted as patients to a locked psychiatric ward to investigate conditions on the inside. And a remote team monitored the project via hidden cameras and microphones from a command center in a nearby hotel.

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