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Sped up audio: Now Hear This, Quickly
The lie detector test: could your voice betray you?
The Superbus mixes rail and road
Ferris wheels are back, and the bigger the better
Congratulations all around: art prizes on the rise
Medicine, start-up, or Star Trek character?
Lightness in Design
QR codes connect paper and online worlds by cellphone camera

Sped up audio: Now Hear This, Quickly

The New York Times – Oct 2, 2003 – Most research has shown that people learn just as well when listening to speech recordings that are played back at two or even three times normal speed. "People who are listening at accelerated speeds learn just as much, and there's some evidence they may learn even a bit more''...

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The lie detector test: could your voice betray you?

The New York Times – July 1, 2004 – Beyond their applications in law enforcement, lie-detector tests are being used in everything from telemarketing to matchmaking. But the technology's reliability is still a matter of debate.

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The Superbus mixes rail and road

The Economist – Sep 21, 2006 – Maglev trains are expensive; buses are cheap. The Superbus, a high-tech road vehicle, is a compromise between the two. It is an electric bus designed to be able to switch seamlessly between ordinary roads and dedicated “supertracks”, on which it can reach speeds of 250kph.

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Ferris wheels are back, and the bigger the better

The New York Times – June 28, 2007 – The success of the London Eye has reinvigorated demand for Ferris wheels, with new “observation wheels” recently opening or being built in Malaysia, Singapore, and Australia, with others planned for Berlin, Dubai, and Beijing. And like with skyscrapers, a heated competition is under way for the world’s tallest.

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Congratulations all around: art prizes on the rise

The New York Times – April 3, 2005 – Over the last few years, museums large and small have started awarding their own prizes, usually named after the institution and sponsored by a corporate donor, to capitalize on the glamour associated with contemporary art.

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Medicine, start-up, or Star Trek character?

Wired – June 4, 2000 – The English language is morphing in the white-hot crucible of global nomenclature, and corporations are doing everything they can to drag us kicking and screaming straight into the 23rd century.

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Lightness in Design

Wired News – Nov 13, 2000 – A strange thing happened to the 'weightless' and dematerialized economy we thought the Internet would bring: it never arrived...

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QR codes connect paper and online worlds by cellphone camera

The New York Times – Oct 4, 2004 – Focusing your camera phone on a code and then clicking any button launches a wireless service -- for example, the ability to buy a train ticket, check an airplane's departure time, or download a ring tone from a store display.

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