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QR codes connect paper and online worlds by cellphone camera
Despite grabbing headlines, art prices don't appreciate well
Dutchtub, a 'new way of outdoor bathing'
High-speed walkways
Virtual volunteers listen, then reach out
Better vision for the world, on a budget
USB turns PC into power plant
Congratulations all around: art prizes on the rise

QR codes connect paper and online worlds by cellphone camera

The New York Times – Oct 4, 2004 – Focusing your camera phone on a code and then clicking any button launches a wireless service -- for example, the ability to buy a train ticket, check an airplane's departure time, or download a ring tone from a store display.

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Despite grabbing headlines, art prices don't appreciate well

The New York Times – Oct 30, 2009 – Art traded from 1951 to 2007 appreciated just a little more than 4 percent annually, much less than the Standard & Poor’s 500 average of 8.90 percent over the same period. The figure is also significantly less than figures from previous studies that pegged art’s annual returns at 8 percent or even 13 percent.

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Dutchtub, a "new way of outdoor bathing"

The New York Times – Jan 14, 2004 – It requires no electricity, plumbing or hot water. Just fill it with water, put firewood in the bin, light it up, wait a while and enjoy a 100-degree soak.

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High-speed walkways

The Economist – Dec 8, 2005 – New moving walkways have been given a speed boost. But will pedestrians in airports and shopping centres be able to cope?

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Virtual volunteers listen, then reach out

The New York Times – Jan 27, 2005 – Virtual volunteers at an aid network known as Nabuur give people in the developing world advice on projects like how to start a youth computer-training center, improve local water quality, or better integrate the village's disabled people. The assumption is that small communities can carry out many public-works projects by themselves if provided with the right information.

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Better vision for the world, on a budget

The New York Times – Jan 2, 2010 – Self-adjustable spectacles, which let untrained wearers set the right focus themselves in less than a minute, greatly reduce the need for trained optometrists, who are rarely available in Africa and many parts of Asia. But the competition is sometimes palpable amongst the companies that want to be the first to distribute adjustable glasses in the millions...

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USB turns PC into power plant

The New York Times – Jun 10, 2004 – When the technology first appeared, U.S.B. meant keyboards, joysticks and the like. But manufacturers began cottoning to U.S.B.'s ability to provide a power source, leading to a host of gizmos that have nothing to do with computers: radios, reading lights, even massage balls and air purifiers.

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Congratulations all around: art prizes on the rise

The New York Times – April 3, 2005 – Over the last few years, museums large and small have started awarding their own prizes, usually named after the institution and sponsored by a corporate donor, to capitalize on the glamour associated with contemporary art.

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