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The Unbearable Lightness of Lightness
Tinkebell's revenge
High-speed walkways
Browsing the future: the third International Browserday
Congratulations all around: art prizes on the rise
Despite grabbing headlines, art prices don't appreciate well
Expo Seeks Greener Pastures
Computerized decision making on the rise

The Unbearable Lightness of Lightness

Wired News – Nov 16, 2000 – New technologies tend to be presented in terms of existing products so consumers will more readily understand and adapt to them.

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Tinkebell's revenge

Wired UK – Aug 11, 2009 – Dutch artist Tinkebell gets lots of hate-mail, so now she's turned the tables on the senders: by using some clever Internet sleuthing, Tinkebell uncovered the identities behind the e-mails, and compiled them in a book with their names, addresses, (naked) photographs, LinkedIn accounts, phone numbers, Facebook pages, and more.

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High-speed walkways

The Economist – Dec 8, 2005 – New moving walkways have been given a speed boost. But will pedestrians in airports and shopping centres be able to cope?

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Browsing the future: the third International Browserday

Wired News – May 20, 2000 – Designers here gathered to examine whether browser mania is just the latest form of "reinventing the wheel," arguing that typographers have spent centuries successfully honing the art of readability. Why add yet another meta-layer of color-coordinated symbols and rotating orbs that first need to be studied before being put into use?

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Congratulations all around: art prizes on the rise

The New York Times – April 3, 2005 – Over the last few years, museums large and small have started awarding their own prizes, usually named after the institution and sponsored by a corporate donor, to capitalize on the glamour associated with contemporary art.

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Despite grabbing headlines, art prices don't appreciate well

The New York Times – Oct 30, 2009 – Art traded from 1951 to 2007 appreciated just a little more than 4 percent annually, much less than the Standard & Poor’s 500 average of 8.90 percent over the same period. The figure is also significantly less than figures from previous studies that pegged art’s annual returns at 8 percent or even 13 percent.

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Expo Seeks Greener Pastures

Wired News – Oct 31, 2000 – Plagued by financial troubles, bad weather and scandals, the notion of world's fairs has come under fire. Are they relics of the 20th century, or do they have a place in the new millennium?

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Computerized decision making on the rise

The New York Times – July 18, 2006 – Mathematical models generally make more accurate predictions than humans do. Studies have shown that models can better predict, for example, the success or failure of a business start-up, the likelihood of recidivism and parole violation, and future performance in graduate school.

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