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The doctors were real, the patients undercover
Collapsible shipping container, packed flat
Despite grabbing headlines, art prices don't appreciate well
USB turns PC into power plant
Virtual volunteers listen, then reach out
Visa procedures blocking European musicians from the U.S. since 9-11
The lie detector test: could your voice betray you?
Dutchtub, a 'new way of outdoor bathing'

The doctors were real, the patients undercover

The New York Times – Nov 20, 2009 – It had all the markings of a television detective show. Posing as patients, three undercover observers got themselves admitted as patients to a locked psychiatric ward to investigate conditions on the inside. And a remote team monitored the project via hidden cameras and microphones from a command center in a nearby hotel.

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Collapsible shipping container, packed flat

The Economist – Dec 30, 2009 – A Dutch engineer has invented a collapsible plastic shipping container which, he hopes, will replace the steel ones. Because it is made of a fibreglass composite, it weighs only three-quarters as much as a standard container but—more importantly— when it is empty, it can be folded down to a quarter of its size.

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Despite grabbing headlines, art prices don't appreciate well

The New York Times – Oct 30, 2009 – Art traded from 1951 to 2007 appreciated just a little more than 4 percent annually, much less than the Standard & Poor’s 500 average of 8.90 percent over the same period. The figure is also significantly less than figures from previous studies that pegged art’s annual returns at 8 percent or even 13 percent.

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USB turns PC into power plant

The New York Times – Jun 10, 2004 – When the technology first appeared, U.S.B. meant keyboards, joysticks and the like. But manufacturers began cottoning to U.S.B.'s ability to provide a power source, leading to a host of gizmos that have nothing to do with computers: radios, reading lights, even massage balls and air purifiers.

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Virtual volunteers listen, then reach out

The New York Times – Jan 27, 2005 – Virtual volunteers at an aid network known as Nabuur give people in the developing world advice on projects like how to start a youth computer-training center, improve local water quality, or better integrate the village's disabled people. The assumption is that small communities can carry out many public-works projects by themselves if provided with the right information.

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Visa procedures blocking European musicians from the U.S. since 9-11

The Village Voice – July 11, 2005 – Tales of musicians from nations like Syria and Cuba being kept at bay by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (formerly the INS) have become commonplace since 9-11. But European and Canadian musicians, too, are finding the consular walls unmanageably high.

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The lie detector test: could your voice betray you?

The New York Times – July 1, 2004 – Beyond their applications in law enforcement, lie-detector tests are being used in everything from telemarketing to matchmaking. But the technology's reliability is still a matter of debate.

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Dutchtub, a "new way of outdoor bathing"

The New York Times – Jan 14, 2004 – It requires no electricity, plumbing or hot water. Just fill it with water, put firewood in the bin, light it up, wait a while and enjoy a 100-degree soak.

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