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Camel milk comes to Europe
Browsing the future: the third International Browserday
Despite grabbing headlines, art prices don't appreciate well
Computerized decision making on the rise
The doctors were real, the patients undercover
Better vision for the world, on a budget
The Unbearable Lightness of Lightness
Visa procedures blocking European musicians from the U.S. since 9-11

Camel milk comes to Europe

The New York Times – Sep 16, 2009 – A Dutch farmer is currently the only one in Europe with permission to sell camel’s milk. He saw an untapped market in the rising number of immigrants to Europe from Somalia and Morocco, where camel’s milk has long been popular for its supposed curative properties.

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Browsing the future: the third International Browserday

Wired News – May 20, 2000 – Designers here gathered to examine whether browser mania is just the latest form of "reinventing the wheel," arguing that typographers have spent centuries successfully honing the art of readability. Why add yet another meta-layer of color-coordinated symbols and rotating orbs that first need to be studied before being put into use?

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Despite grabbing headlines, art prices don't appreciate well

The New York Times – Oct 30, 2009 – Art traded from 1951 to 2007 appreciated just a little more than 4 percent annually, much less than the Standard & Poor’s 500 average of 8.90 percent over the same period. The figure is also significantly less than figures from previous studies that pegged art’s annual returns at 8 percent or even 13 percent.

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Computerized decision making on the rise

The New York Times – July 18, 2006 – Mathematical models generally make more accurate predictions than humans do. Studies have shown that models can better predict, for example, the success or failure of a business start-up, the likelihood of recidivism and parole violation, and future performance in graduate school.

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The doctors were real, the patients undercover

The New York Times – Nov 20, 2009 – It had all the markings of a television detective show. Posing as patients, three undercover observers got themselves admitted as patients to a locked psychiatric ward to investigate conditions on the inside. And a remote team monitored the project via hidden cameras and microphones from a command center in a nearby hotel.

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Better vision for the world, on a budget

The New York Times – Jan 2, 2010 – Self-adjustable spectacles, which let untrained wearers set the right focus themselves in less than a minute, greatly reduce the need for trained optometrists, who are rarely available in Africa and many parts of Asia. But the competition is sometimes palpable amongst the companies that want to be the first to distribute adjustable glasses in the millions...

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The Unbearable Lightness of Lightness

Wired News – Nov 16, 2000 – New technologies tend to be presented in terms of existing products so consumers will more readily understand and adapt to them.

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Visa procedures blocking European musicians from the U.S. since 9-11

The Village Voice – July 11, 2005 – Tales of musicians from nations like Syria and Cuba being kept at bay by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (formerly the INS) have become commonplace since 9-11. But European and Canadian musicians, too, are finding the consular walls unmanageably high.

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