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Browsing the future: the third International Browserday
Software piracy is in resurgence, with new safeguards eroded by file sharing
Dutchtub, a 'new way of outdoor bathing'
Green ship-breaking making waves
Computerized decision making on the rise
Flash drives: always on the go, without moving parts
Camel milk comes to Europe
Patent fights are a legacy of the tangled origins of MP3

Browsing the future: the third International Browserday

Wired News – May 20, 2000 – Designers here gathered to examine whether browser mania is just the latest form of "reinventing the wheel," arguing that typographers have spent centuries successfully honing the art of readability. Why add yet another meta-layer of color-coordinated symbols and rotating orbs that first need to be studied before being put into use?

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Software piracy is in resurgence, with new safeguards eroded by file sharing

The New York Times – Jan 19, 2004 – The software industry has developed techniques to safeguard programs and thwart pirates, and global software piracy rates have declined somewhat. Yet the advent of peer-to-peer, or P2P, file-sharing programs like Kazaa is quickly eroding those gains.

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Dutchtub, a "new way of outdoor bathing"

The New York Times – Jan 14, 2004 – It requires no electricity, plumbing or hot water. Just fill it with water, put firewood in the bin, light it up, wait a while and enjoy a 100-degree soak.

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Green ship-breaking making waves

The Economist – Dec 8, 2005 – The low-tech graveyards where ships are picked apart by hand could give way to a greener, more high-tech alternative.

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Computerized decision making on the rise

The New York Times – July 18, 2006 – Mathematical models generally make more accurate predictions than humans do. Studies have shown that models can better predict, for example, the success or failure of a business start-up, the likelihood of recidivism and parole violation, and future performance in graduate school.

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Flash drives: always on the go, without moving parts

The New York Times – Feb 17, 2005 – From humble origins as geeky novelties, thumb-size U.S.B. flash drives have grown into a billion-dollar market.

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Camel milk comes to Europe

The New York Times – Sep 16, 2009 – A Dutch farmer is currently the only one in Europe with permission to sell camel’s milk. He saw an untapped market in the rising number of immigrants to Europe from Somalia and Morocco, where camel’s milk has long been popular for its supposed curative properties.

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Patent fights are a legacy of the tangled origins of MP3

The New York Times – March 4, 2007 – Until now, the most prominent holder of MP3 patents has been the Fraunhofer Society of Germany. But other companies, including Thomson, Philips and Alcatel-Lucent, are increasingly being backed up by aggressive enforcement efforts.

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