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Animal speech: Attention, cows: please speak into the microphone
Collapsible shipping container, packed flat
QR codes connect paper and online worlds by cellphone camera
Medicine, start-up, or Star Trek character?
Flash drives: always on the go, without moving parts
Virtual volunteers listen, then reach out
Visa procedures blocking European musicians from the U.S. since 9-11
The doctors were real, the patients undercover

Animal speech: Attention, cows: please speak into the microphone

The New York Times – Oct 31, 2002 – Though it all sounds very Dr. Dolittle, the sounds that many animal species make can be analyzed and identified using many of the same techniques that have allowed human voice recognition to make the leap from high-tech novelty to valuable application.

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Collapsible shipping container, packed flat

The Economist – Dec 30, 2009 – A Dutch engineer has invented a collapsible plastic shipping container which, he hopes, will replace the steel ones. Because it is made of a fibreglass composite, it weighs only three-quarters as much as a standard container but—more importantly— when it is empty, it can be folded down to a quarter of its size.

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QR codes connect paper and online worlds by cellphone camera

The New York Times – Oct 4, 2004 – Focusing your camera phone on a code and then clicking any button launches a wireless service -- for example, the ability to buy a train ticket, check an airplane's departure time, or download a ring tone from a store display.

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Medicine, start-up, or Star Trek character?

Wired – June 4, 2000 – The English language is morphing in the white-hot crucible of global nomenclature, and corporations are doing everything they can to drag us kicking and screaming straight into the 23rd century.

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Flash drives: always on the go, without moving parts

The New York Times – Feb 17, 2005 – From humble origins as geeky novelties, thumb-size U.S.B. flash drives have grown into a billion-dollar market.

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Virtual volunteers listen, then reach out

The New York Times – Jan 27, 2005 – Virtual volunteers at an aid network known as Nabuur give people in the developing world advice on projects like how to start a youth computer-training center, improve local water quality, or better integrate the village's disabled people. The assumption is that small communities can carry out many public-works projects by themselves if provided with the right information.

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Visa procedures blocking European musicians from the U.S. since 9-11

The Village Voice – July 11, 2005 – Tales of musicians from nations like Syria and Cuba being kept at bay by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (formerly the INS) have become commonplace since 9-11. But European and Canadian musicians, too, are finding the consular walls unmanageably high.

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The doctors were real, the patients undercover

The New York Times – Nov 20, 2009 – It had all the markings of a television detective show. Posing as patients, three undercover observers got themselves admitted as patients to a locked psychiatric ward to investigate conditions on the inside. And a remote team monitored the project via hidden cameras and microphones from a command center in a nearby hotel.

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